Mets owner Steve Cohen listing $ 150M + NYC megamansion

Mets owner Steve Cohen isn’t just trading players this summer.

The hedge fund billionaire may also be making a trade on the home front, where his West Village fortress is unofficially on the market for “well over” $ 150 million, sources tell Gimme Shelter exclusively.

Cohen’s spokesperson declined to comment.

The mighty 30,000-square-foot residence, at 703-711 Washington St., is a newly built townhouse – something rare for the historic neighborhood.

Cohen bought 145 Perry St., on the corner of Washington, for $ 28.8 million in 2012.

He also bought 703 Washington St. for $ 38.8 million the same year.

The residence spans multiple addresses along Washington Street and some 30,000 square feet of prime space.
The residence spans multiple addresses along Washington Street and 30,000 square feet of prime space.
Stefano Giovannini
If you want it, you'll need to cough up more than $ 150 million.
If you want it, you’ll need to cough up more than $ 150 million.
Stefano Giovannini

Then he spent years – and tens of millions of dollars – to create a single-family megamansion.

The lot – a former two-story parking garage – is so big that at one point it was slated to become a seven-story, 93-room hotel. It was also pitched as two $ 20 million, six-story townhouses.

But the plan morphed into a mansion designed by Leroy Street Studio, with Robert Silman Associates Structural Engineers.

This time, Cohen’s plans to sell his castle are more, well, discreet. The last time he put his personal residence on the market, he was in for a crushing reality.

In 2013, Cohen listed his Midtown duplex penthouse at One Beacon Court – also known as Bloomberg Tower – for $ 115 million.

But the 9,000-square-foot residence, designed by late architect Charles Gwathmey, was ultimately subject to a 75% price chop.

It finally sold for $ 30.5 million eight years later. (It resold in April for $ 33 million, according to property records.)

Cohen’s bronze, terracotta and wood mansion boasts a curving staircase, an elevator, multiple fireplaces, a home theater, a chef’s kitchen, a landscaped roof deck and a rear garden.

It had been the object of curiosity for years until the scaffolding was removed last year.

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