McCarthy faces House Republican caucus following revelations in leaked audio – live | Republicans

Thompson: January 6 panel to pursue McCarthy again

Kevin McCarthy is likely to face new pressure this week to appear before the bipartisan panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, its chairman has said, as the House minority leader faces angry Republican colleagues this morning.

The embattled GOP chief was caught in a lie over the January 6 insurrection by the New York Times, which released audio clips capturing the purported Donald Trump ally saying he would call for Trump’s resignation, which he denied.

Possibly more damaging for McCarthy’s hopes of one day becoming House speaker is the Times’ latest release, in which he suggests far-right Republican lawmakers could incite violence against colleagues.

In a recording made on January 10 last year, four days after Trump supporters rioted at the Capitol building and amid the then-president’s efforts to overturn his election defeat by Joe BidenMcCarthy tells fellow Republican leaders that extremist politicians are “putting people in jeopardy” with incendiary statements and tweets.

Vocal Trump acolytes Matt Gaetz of Florida and Mo Brooks of Alabama are identified by McCarthy as particularly likely to endanger other lawmakers’ security.

Gaetz, predictably, reacted with fury, exposing Republican fissures in a tweet attacking both McCarthy and minority whip Steve Scalise:

McCarthy faces the House GOP caucus later this morning, with the knowledge that the January 6 panel is pressing again to get him to testify.

According to the Associated Press, the panel expects to decide this week about issuing a second request to McCarthy, who has declined to appear voluntarily, and is also looking at summoning a widening group of House Republicans for interviews.

The committee is looking into the riot and Trump’s attempts to cling on to power. Its chair, the Mississippi Democrat Bennie Thompsonsays the panel will hold public meetings in June, and expects to release a report in the early fall.

Read more:

US-Russia prisoner swap frees former marine

Russia and the US have carried out a dramatic prisoner exchange, trading a marine veteran jailed in Moscow for a convicted Russian drug trafficker serving a long prison sentence in America, a senior US official and the Russian foreign ministry said.

The surprise deal would have been a notable diplomatic maneuver even in times of peace, but it was all the more extraordinary because it was completed as Russia’s war with Ukraine has driven relations with the US to their lowest point in decades, the Associated Press says.

Trevor Reed.
Trevor Reed. Photograph: Alexander Nemenov / AFP / Getty Images

As part of the exchange, Russia released Trevor Reeda former marine from Texas who was arrested in the summer of 2019 after Russian authorities said he assaulted an officer while being driven by police to a police station following a night of heavy drinking.

Reed was later sentenced to nine years in prison, though his family has maintained his innocence and the US government has described him as unjustly detained.

The US agreed to return Konstantin Yaroshenkoa Russian pilot serving a 20-year federal prison sentence in Connecticut for conspiracy to smuggle cocaine into the US after he was arrested in Liberia in 2010 and extradited to the US.

Read more:

Thompson: January 6 panel to pursue McCarthy again

Kevin McCarthy is likely to face new pressure this week to appear before the bipartisan panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, its chairman has said, as the House minority leader faces angry Republican colleagues this morning.

The embattled GOP chief was caught in a lie over the January 6 insurrection by the New York Times, which released audio clips capturing the purported Donald Trump ally saying he would call for Trump’s resignation, which he denied.

Possibly more damaging for McCarthy’s hopes of one day becoming House speaker is the Times’ latest release, in which he suggests far-right Republican lawmakers could incite violence against colleagues.

In a recording made on January 10 last year, four days after Trump supporters rioted at the Capitol building and amid the then-president’s efforts to overturn his election defeat by Joe BidenMcCarthy tells fellow Republican leaders that extremist politicians are “putting people in jeopardy” with incendiary statements and tweets.

Vocal Trump acolytes Matt Gaetz of Florida and Mo Brooks of Alabama are identified by McCarthy as particularly likely to endanger other lawmakers’ security.

Gaetz, predictably, reacted with fury, exposing Republican fissures in a tweet attacking both McCarthy and minority whip Steve Scalise:

McCarthy faces the House GOP caucus later this morning, with the knowledge that the January 6 panel is pressing again to get him to testify.

According to the Associated Press, the panel expects to decide this week about issuing a second request to McCarthy, who has declined to appear voluntarily, and is also looking at summoning a widening group of House Republicans for interviews.

The committee is looking into the riot and Trump’s attempts to cling on to power. Its chair, the Mississippi Democrat Bennie Thompsonsays the panel will hold public meetings in June, and expects to release a report in the early fall.

Read more:

Good morning, and welcome to the midweek edition of our US politics blog.

It’s going to be an uncomfortable morning for the House minority leader Kevin McCarthywho faces his Republican caucus for the first time since he was caught in a lie by the New York Times over the 6 January insurrection.

Audio clips released by the newspaper captured the purported Donald Trump ally saying he would call for Trump’s resignation, which he denied.

But possibly more damaging for McCarthy’s hopes of one day becoming House speaker is the Times’ latest release, in which he suggests far-right Republican lawmakers could incite violence against colleagues.

McCarthy faces the House GOP caucus at 10am.

Here’s what else were watching today:

  • Anthony Fauci, the government’s top infectious diseases expert, has declared the Covid-19 pandemic effective over in the US, according to the Washington Post. Curiously, however, he’s skipping the White House correspondents’ dinner this weekend for fear of catching it.
  • Homeland security secretary Alejandro Mayorkas will appear before both House and Senate committees today trying to explain how the Biden administration intends to fix the pickle it has got itself into over ending the Trump-era Title 42 immigration policy.
  • Joe Bidenand Bill and Hillary Clintonwill attend the funeral in Washington DC for Madeleine Albrightthe former secretary of state who died last month.
  • The House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection will hold public meetings in June, and expects to release a report in the early fall, its chair Bennie Thompson has said.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *