Here’s how an autonomous vehicle pulls over for a police car

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A Cruise autonomous car fleet is being tested as a taxi service in San Francisco.

A Cruise autonomous car fleet is being tested as a taxi service in San Francisco.
(Cruise)

A San Francisco police patrol was befuddled one night in early April when it pulled over a Chevrolet Bolt EV with its headlights off only to discover the driver’s seat was empty.

“Ain’t nobody in it,” one officer can be heard on video of the incident shot by a bystander.

It was not an ordinary Bolt, however, but one of the fully autonomous taxis being tested in the city by General Motors-owned Cruise. The vehicles are equipped with an array of external sensors to enable self-driving capability within a geo-fenced area of ​​San Francisco and can identify the lights and sounds of a police car attempting to pull it over.

The Cruise vehicles are Chevrolet Bolt EVs equipped with an array of sensors.

The Cruise vehicles are Chevrolet Bolt EVs equipped with an array of sensors.
(Cruise)

After pausing for a moment as the officer checks it out and walks away, the vehicle can then be seen driving away across an intersection and pulling over again with its hazard lights activated.

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A Cruise spokeswoman told Fox News Autos the vehicle was not going on the lam, but that it had alerted human Cruise personnel at a remote command center who saw that it had been subjected to a traffic stop and remotely directed it to pull over to a safer location when the officer moved out of the way.

Cruise is allowed to operate its vehicles without a backup safety driver in San Francisco.

Cruise is allowed to operate its vehicles without a backup safety driver in San Francisco.
(Cruise)

“We work closely with the SFPD on how to interact with our vehicles and have a dedicated phone number for them to call in situations like this,” the spokeswoman added.

After talking to Cruise, the police decided not to issue a citation and the vehicle was allowed to continue on its way.

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As for why the headlights were off in the first place, it was due to human error and the issue has since been corrected, according to Cruise.

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