JetBlue CEO in Boston to debut new service after days of flight delays, cancellations

One of the busiest airlines operating out of Boston Logan International Airport will be adding new overseas routes this summer. JetBlue CEO Robin Hayes announced Tuesday that the airline will begin flying from Boston to London Gatwick on Jul. 19. Flights to London Heathrow will follow, starting on Aug. 22. Tickets are already on sale and Hayes announced the airline will offer introductory fares of $ 499 round-trip to London and under $ 2,000 round-trip in its Mint business class.After the announcement, Hayes was also expected to face some tough questions from reporters about recent travel disruptions involving the airline. On Monday, 222 flights to or from Logan were delayed, 58% of those were JetBlue flights, and 53 flights were canceled – just under 70% of those belonging to JetBlue. Jetblue had most of the issues, but several other airlines also experienced delays and cancellations. A spokesperson for JetBlue said the number of flight delays and cancellations is not specific to JetBlue, and that severe weather in the Southeast and multiple air traffic control delay programs have created significant impacts on the industry over the past several days.The airline said it has made progress getting crewmembers and planes back in position and has apologized to customers. “It is normal for it to take a few days to fully recover when these situations so significantly impact our operations. We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience and we are working to keep them updated and get them on their way as quickly as possible, “JetBlue said in a statement.” They would be waiting on a crew, and the last crew might have been delayed, and then they would hit their maximum time they could fly that day, “traveler Tina Dinh said.The frustration is also being felt by flight crews. The Transportation Worker’s Union said Jetblue is unfairly blaming crew members for the delays. According to the Transport Workers Union of America, Ed Baklor, head of JetBlue’s Customer Care and Programs, issued a statement on March 28 that indicated the operational problems at JetBlue are being caused by flight attendants refusing to accept assignments. “It’s time for JetBlue to stop playing the blame game with their flight attendants,” Gary Peterson, TWU International Vice President and Air Division Director, said in a news release. in the union’s statement. “Our flight attendants showed up and kept this airline flying during the pandemic. Now it’s time for management to show up for them. ”“ Flight attendants are not the cause of these problems. They are the reason customers come back to JetBlue, “TWU International President John Samuelsen said in the union’s statement.” The TWU is ready to meet on these issues immediately. It is time for JetBlue to take responsibility for poor management decisions and to come to the table to negotiate real solutions that will address the real problems. ”

One of the busiest airlines operating out of Boston Logan International Airport will be adding new overseas routes this summer.

JetBlue CEO Robin Hayes announced Tuesday that the airline will begin flying from Boston to London Gatwick on Jul. 19. Flights to London Heathrow will follow, starting on Aug. 22.

Tickets are already on sale and Hayes announced the airline will offer introductory fares of $ 499 round-trip to London and under $ 2,000 round-trip in its Mint business class.

After the announcement, Hayes was also expected to face some tough questions from reporters about recent travel disruptions involving the airline.

On Monday, 222 flights to or from Logan were delayed, 58% of those were JetBlue flights, and 53 flights were canceled – just under 70% of those belonging to JetBlue.

Jetblue had most of the issues, but several other airlines also experienced delays and cancellations.

A spokesperson for JetBlue said the number of flight delays and cancellations is not specific to JetBlue, and that severe weather in the Southeast and multiple air traffic control delay programs have created significant impacts on the industry over the past several days.

The airline said it has made progress getting crewmembers and planes back in position and has apologized to customers.

“It is normal for it to take a few days to fully recover when these situations so significantly impact our operations. We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience and we are working to keep them updated and get them on their way as quickly as possible, “JetBlue said in a statement.

“They would be waiting on a crew, and the last crew might have been delayed, and then they would hit their maximum time they could fly that day,” traveler Tina Dinh said.

The frustration is also being felt by flight crews. The Transportation Worker’s Union said Jetblue is unfairly blaming crew members for the delays.

According to the Transport Workers Union of America, Ed Baklor, head of JetBlue’s Customer Care and Programs, issued a statement on March 28 that indicated the operational problems at JetBlue are being caused by flight attendants refusing to accept assignments. The union said, in a news release, that Baklor’s statement could not be further from the truth.

“It’s time for JetBlue to stop playing the blame game with their flight attendants,” Gary Peterson, TWU International Vice President and Air Division Director, said in the union’s statement. “Our flight attendants showed up and kept this airline flying during the pandemic. Now it’s time for management to show up for them. ”

Flight attendants are not the cause of these problems. They are the reason customers come back to JetBlue, “TWU International President John Samuelsen said in the union’s statement.” The TWU is ready to meet on these issues immediately. It is time for JetBlue to take responsibility for poor management decisions and to come to the table to negotiate real solutions that will address the real problems. ”

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